West Ranch High School

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John Dichirico » Lecture Series

Lecture Series

Each semester students will participate in learning about a specific lecture series. Each series tackles a variety of beliefs, perspectives, experiences, and controversies related to the American Deaf community and American Deaf culture. Students will receive a packet to complete during these series, with one exception in ASL 3, and are expected to complete the packet as they learn. In addition, lecture series are conducted live or through pre-recorded videos. Both provide the same information and students always have access to the pre-recorded videos (except during Exam week). 
 
Students will be asked to apply the knowledge they learn throughout the semester two times during each Unit Exam or midterm and final. Students who only restate the knowledge they learned run the risk of receiving a low score on their exams. During these exams, students are allowed and encouraged to use their packets and therefore, students who do not complete the packet may struggle. In addition, students may and have used the internet during these exams, which is allowed but what the internet provides and what the lecture series teaches do not always go hand in hand. Again, students are running the risk of receiving a low score if they only utilize the internet.
 
Cultural essays, presentations, and projects are each worth 10% of students' grade and students have two cultural exams a semester for a total of 20% of the students' overall semester grade.
This lecture series will introduce students into the medical and cultural perspectives of deafness. Students will learn how the ear works, the process of hearing, and current technological trends in the medical field. Throughout this series students will also learn, watch, and read about stories of the Deaf perspective on how they view deafness, themselves, and assistive listening devices.
 
To demonstrate their understanding of the knowledge, students must apply the information they learn to several prompts. First, students will write an essay about finding a "cure" for deafness and the moral implications for finding a "cure" (1.1 C). Second, will apply their knowledge to a hypothetical situation and explain and defend their position on the cochlear implant (1.2 C).
 
In both situations, students must support their explanation with knowledge they learned throughout the series, provide a perspective from both sides of the argument, and need to be able to articulate their feelings and thoughts and provide reasonings, examples, definitions, etc. to defend their argument. Students who do not clearly articulate their thoughts or do not show a reflection of the information taught may receive a lower score. Students are allowed to have any thoughts, feelings, and perspectives they want on these issues but they must be able to defend their argument with credible sources (peer reviewed journals, documentaries, stories from Deaf individuals, etc.).
 
During this semester, students will watch several films and documentaries. More details can be found on the Movies and Documentaries page.
 
Student Learning Objectives:
1.1 C
Student will demonstrate their knowledge and understanding about the ear and causes of deafness by explaining how deafness can occur and the possible issues and concerns with finding a cure to deafness. Student will use medical definitions and explanations to defend their argument. In addition, they may use secondary resources provided in class, no outside research is required.

 

1.2C

Student will demonstrate their understanding of the ear, causes of Deafness, Deaf people, and cochlear implants by creating a PowerPoint that details the complexities that surround the cochlear implant debate. Then students will defend a position on why a newborn who is deaf should or should not receive a cochlear implant. Student must define and defend their position with research from credible sources and must include documentaries, articles, or other materials that were used in class.
This lecture series will introduce students into a variety of cultural perspectives, how we reflect and analyze the experiences of historically marginalized groups, and compare the experiences of others with our own experiences. Throughout this series students will also learn, watch, and read about stories from the Deaf community and sometimes from other marginalized groups. 
 
To demonstrate their understanding of the knowledge, students will be expected to write a comparison essay about their own experiences compared to another individual. Students will compare their experiences to a character from a book that is read during class. Books or a PDF version of the book will be provided for students. Secondly, students will demonstrate their knowledge by comparing a culture with American Deaf Culture. They will compare experiences, struggles, and systematic oppressions of the two groups. Although most cultures are acceptable to compare, cultures will need to be approved to ensure that students have enough to write about, can compare the two groups, and meet the requirements of the assignment. 
 
In both situations, students must support their explanation with knowledge they learned throughout the series by providing reasonings, examples, definitions, etc. Students who do not clearly articulate their thoughts or do not show a reflection of the information taught may receive a lower score. Students are allowed to have any thoughts, feelings, and perspectives they want but they must be able to defend their argument with credible sources (peer reviewed journals, documentaries, stories from Deaf individuals, etc.).
 
Student Learning Objectives:
1.3 C
Using an external source, book, documentary, or movie, students will compare and contrast their life with a CODA or Deaf teenager. Students must explain experiences they both share and how it is related to them being teenagers. Then explain experiences that they will never experience because they are not Deaf and/or they do not have Deaf parents.

 

1.4 C

Students will create a multimedia presentation about a culture and compare it with the American Deaf Culture. The second culture must also be a minority group in the United States and students will compare the experiences, struggles, and systematic oppressions of the groups.
For this semester students will learn about the education experience for Deaf students and learn about possible inequities in the education system. Students will be asked to compare their own experiences and privileges to the experiences of Deaf students. Throughout this series students will learn, watch, read, and analyze different components of the education system. In addition, students will be asked how could Deaf students be better supported during their K-12 career. 
 
To demonstrate their understanding of the knowledge, students will be asked to apply their learning to hypothetical situations. The first situation (2.1C) will ask students to support a Deaf student struggling with the English language. Since ASL and English are two different languages, Deaf students often struggle with writing in English. Students will offer ways to improve their English writing ability. The second situation (2.2C) will ask students to create the foundations of a school and what policies, designs, etc. will best support Deaf students? 
 
In both situations, students must support their arguments with what was learned and discussed throughout the lecture series. Students may make any decision they want but it important that their decisions are supported with research, experiences, stories, or other successful models. Students who do not support their argument run the risk of receiving a low grade. 
 
Student Learning Objectives:
2.1 C
Student will demonstrate their knowledge and understand about the Deaf Learner and their understanding of ASL and English by deciphering an incorrect English story, paragraph, etc. written by a Deaf Learner, translate it into English, and then argue or defend the decisions the Deaf Learner made. Then explain how a teacher or themselves could support the student as they rewrite the paragraph or story.

 

2.2 C

Student will demonstrate their understanding of the Deaf Learner experience by creating the foundations of a school that would positively support Deaf Learners including school policies, classroom layout, and educational plan to teach English to Deaf Learners. The presentations will include a visual aid component such as design plan or diorama to support their presentation. Each decision made by the student must be supported by primary or secondary sources and credible research studies.
In this lecture series we will analyze and reflect on history to determine the current beliefs, feelings, and perspectives towards the Deaf community in the United States. Students will be asked to make connections between history events and individuals and how that impacts the wider hearing community. How certain beliefs were created and how those beliefs influence decisions and ideologies of future individuals and groups. 
 
To demonstrate their understanding of the knowledge, students will first be asked to use historical events to create a connection between events and individuals to explain how a current belief and perspective was originated (2.3 C). Second, students will be asked to use primary and secondary sources to determine how the hearing majority viewed Deaf individuals during a certain time period where the is limited primary sources from Deaf individuals (2.4 C). Students must explain how they came to their conclusions on views of Deaf people using nearby events, people, and stories to defend their argument.
 
In both situations, students must support their arguments with what was learned and discussed throughout the lecture series. More importantly, students must use the primary and secondary sources provided throughout the series. Students may make any decision they want but it important that their decisions are supported with research, experiences, stories, or other successful models. Students who do not support their argument run the risk of receiving a low grade. 
 
Student Learning Objectives:
2.3 C
Using historical events and people, students will explain societies perspective on the Deaf community, how that created or fostered negative views, and how the mainstream community stumped and prevented the growth of Deaf people. To support their claims students must use primary and secondary sources. The student must draw conclusions from the documents that they reference and come to a logical conclusion about their topic.

 

2.4 C

Working in a group, students will create a PowerPoint that analyzes a historical event to create a claim about what it was like to be deaf during that time period or event. Students will discuss three perspectives, societal, family, and self perspective. To support their claims students will use research, information learned, and Deaf people's own work to create a comparison for their claim.
This semester will not be a lecture series but instead students will learn about the De'VIA movement and will be asked to analyze art by Deaf artists. Students will also learn about Deaf Cinema and, again, will be asked to analyze short films by Deaf creators. 
 
To demonstrate their understanding of the knowledge, students will analyze art pieces and explain why they are or are not De'VIA pieces. In addition, students will create their own art piece and explain why it meets the requirements of De'VIA (3.1 C). Secondly, students will be asked to explain how a film meets the requirements of Deaf Cinema and will also be asked to produce their own short, silent film that meets the requirements of Deaf Cinema (3.2 C).
 
In both situations, students must directly apply what they learn to the source material. In addition, students must give concrete examples by pointing to specific sections of the art piece or give time markers during the film. Then students must explain how that example meets De'VIA or Deaf Cinema requirements.
 
Student Learning Objectives:
3.1 C
Student will demonstrate their understanding of the De'VIA movement and how Deaf artist reflect their experiences in their pieces. Student will analyze and explain various pieces and how they meet De'VIA requirements. In addition, student will also recreate or create an art piece that reflects the idea of De'VIA.

 

3.2 C

Student will demonstrate their understanding of the Deaf Cinema and Deaf Lens by analyzing various films by various creators. Student will explain how a film meets the requirements by giving concrete examples and using appropriate terminology. Finally, students will create a short film that meets the requirements or analyze a film and write how it could be improved to meet the requirements of Deaf Cinema.
For their final semester, students will dive into the field of linguistics. Students will learn about linguistics and apply it to both English and American Sign Language, with the focus on ASL.
 
To demonstrate their understanding of the knowledge, students will be asked to apply the knowledge and present their findings or creation. First, students will be asked to conduct a small study or experiment and will present their findings to their peers. Students will base their study off the book we read and conduct a survey based on one of the claims the authors make (3.3 C). Secondly, students be asked to apply all of their knowledge from ASL 1, 2, and 3 to create a packet meant for parents who found out their infant or child is deaf. 
 
In both situations, students must support their arguments with what was learned and discussed throughout the lecture series. More importantly, students must use the primary and secondary sources provided throughout the series. Students may make any decision they want but it important that their decisions are supported with research, experiences, stories, or other successful models. Students who do not support their argument run the risk of receiving a low grade. 
 
Student Learning Objectives:
3.3 C
Working with a partner, students will use primary and secondary research to find a linguistical claim made by past research and add to the claim made by conducting their own research with their student population. After concluding with their own research students will present their methods, questions, & findings, in front of an audience and how their research did or did not support the original claim & give an explanation on why.

 

3.4 C

Working with a partner, students create a Parent Informational Packet that provides information on what to expect, what to do, and how to raise a Deaf infant. The multi-media product must include information about first language acquisition, second language learning, myths about raising a Deaf child, and credible research to support their information. Finally, the product is presented in front of an audience.